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Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Thu Aug 18, 2022 11:09 pm
by Cratedigger
Ah beat me to it

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Thu Aug 18, 2022 11:09 pm
by Chris Stritzel
At least the ordinance passed. Take that "L" KCTenants. Now, even though it's a little bit better, we'll see if developments come back. That second part of the legislation, to streamline the process, needs to advance though.

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Thu Aug 18, 2022 11:12 pm
by Chris Stritzel
The KCTenants meltdown on twitter is hilarious.

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Thu Aug 18, 2022 11:47 pm
by AlkaliAxel
Chris Stritzel wrote: Thu Aug 18, 2022 11:09 pm At least the ordinance passed. Take that "L" KCTenants. Now, even though it's a little bit better, we'll see if developments come back. That second part of the legislation, to streamline the process, needs to advance though.
They better stay strong and fucking ram it through

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2022 10:12 am
by TheBigChuckbowski
This is better than it was but I still don't see it helping all that much. It's still super restrictive and arbitrary. The process part of this is significantly more important IMO.

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2022 12:24 pm
by DColeKC
Chris Stritzel wrote: Thu Aug 18, 2022 11:12 pm The KCTenants meltdown on twitter is hilarious.
Wish I was on Twitter to see it.

What exactly do they consider affordable?

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2022 12:42 pm
by Highlander
Chris Stritzel wrote: Thu Aug 18, 2022 11:09 pm At least the ordinance passed. Take that "L" KCTenants. Now, even though it's a little bit better, we'll see if developments come back. That second part of the legislation, to streamline the process, needs to advance though.
Its astounding how many people in this country take positions that are contrary to their own interests. It should be clear to all that no apartments are going to be built if projects are burdened with the kind of affordable housing requirements that KC has had. The result is exactly the opposite of the intended outcome. Talk about unintended consequences.

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2022 12:53 pm
by AlkaliAxel
Vote was 9-4 to pass it.

Eric Bunch was one of the 4. Gonna be honest I thought he had wised up on this issue…nope nevermind. Super disappointed.

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2022 1:08 pm
by Cratedigger
AlkaliAxel wrote: Fri Aug 19, 2022 12:53 pm Vote was 9-4 to pass it.

Eric Bunch was one of the 4. Gonna be honest I thought he had wised up on this issue…nope nevermind. Super disappointed.
Saw him at a StrongTowns presentation yesterday… was surprised he voted no

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Fri Aug 19, 2022 1:58 pm
by trexel94
Highlander wrote: Fri Aug 19, 2022 12:42 pm
Chris Stritzel wrote: Thu Aug 18, 2022 11:09 pm At least the ordinance passed. Take that "L" KCTenants. Now, even though it's a little bit better, we'll see if developments come back. That second part of the legislation, to streamline the process, needs to advance though.
Its astounding how many people in this country take positions that are contrary to their own interests. It should be clear to all that no apartments are going to be built if projects are burdened with the kind of affordable housing requirements that KC has had. The result is exactly the opposite of the intended outcome. Talk about unintended consequences.
Its really not surprising. Most are minimum wage workers or unemployed/unemployable with little education or critical thinking ability who are easily riled up by populist rhetoric. Economics 101 would do them good. Can't say I feel sorry for them. If you're 30 and still make minimum wage, that's your own fault.

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Fri Aug 26, 2022 12:23 pm
by AlkaliAxel
Are they still gonna vote to change the incentive process to the City Manager approving projects now or not?

They voted to change the other parts of the process and then tabled it for now, so where’s this one?

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Mon Sep 19, 2022 1:15 am
by FangKC
The City Council approved an ordinance Sept. 15 allowing Accessory Dwelling Units (ADA) within Kansas City.

https://www.kcmo.gov/Home/Components/News/News/1946/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q66LXCkvngM&t=3s

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2022 6:48 am
by Cratedigger
Now this is interesting. Westside Neighborhood is tapping the same incentive program Three Light and the KC Star building used to avoid people being priced out.

https://www.bizjournals.com/kansascity ... ement.html
Households with earning of less than 27% of the city's median income, currently, less than $15,000, will pay taxes only on their land, exclusive of improvements, for 10 years, followed by a set 2.65% of annual income for the next 15 years.

Westside households with annual income between $15,000 and $75,000 would pay 2.65% of their annual income for the abatement's 25-year duration. The majority of neighborhood homes, about 362, are believed to fall under this bracket.

Residents with annual household incomes between $75,000 and $150,000 will receive a 40%, seven-year property tax abatement, while those making above $150,000 per year can receive a 10%, seven-year abatement.

Beyond local taxing jurisdictions, a portion of the payments will flow to the Westside Redevelopment Corp. as "support fees" to help finance home improvement projects for low-income residents.

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2022 5:12 pm
by daGOAT
Cratedigger wrote: Wed Oct 12, 2022 6:48 am Now this is interesting. Westside Neighborhood is tapping the same incentive program Three Light and the KC Star building used to avoid people being priced out.

https://www.bizjournals.com/kansascity ... ement.html
Households with earning of less than 27% of the city's median income, currently, less than $15,000, will pay taxes only on their land, exclusive of improvements, for 10 years, followed by a set 2.65% of annual income for the next 15 years.

Westside households with annual income between $15,000 and $75,000 would pay 2.65% of their annual income for the abatement's 25-year duration. The majority of neighborhood homes, about 362, are believed to fall under this bracket.

Residents with annual household incomes between $75,000 and $150,000 will receive a 40%, seven-year property tax abatement, while those making above $150,000 per year can receive a 10%, seven-year abatement.

Beyond local taxing jurisdictions, a portion of the payments will flow to the Westside Redevelopment Corp. as "support fees" to help finance home improvement projects for low-income residents.
Could be a good method for Historic Northeast one day!

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Sun Nov 20, 2022 6:13 pm
by Cratedigger
https://www.transit.dot.gov/about/news ... ities-plan

Are there plans in KC to pursue these grants? Have to imagine this, combined with the $50 million that was just approved, is an opportunity for achieving affordable, TOD housing
Thursday, November 17, 2022
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Transit Administration (FTA) today announced 19 awards totaling approximately $13.1 million from President Biden's Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to help boost local economies, fight climate change, and provide more transportation options through development near new or expanded transit project corridors.

These grants, funded by FTA's Pilot Program for Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) Planning, support local strategies to increase transit access and encourage ridership through mixed-use and mixed-income development near public transportation projects. The program helps communities plan for opportunities created by new transit stations, such as affordable housing, economic development, and better connections to schools, hospitals, stores, and restaurants. 

Re: Affordable Housing

Posted: Tue Nov 22, 2022 2:50 pm
by KCtoBrooklyn
From the Atlantic, "The U.S. Needs More Housing Than Almost Anyone Can Imagine":
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archi ... es/672184/
In one recent survey, just 30 to 40 percent of American adults said they believed that increasing the housing stock would slash prices and rents; that belief—often described as “supply skepticism”—in turn dampened their enthusiasm for new construction. Such mistrust is rooted in a confluence of events that countless city dwellers have seen with their own eyes: The laundromat closes. The soulless five-over-one condo building goes up. Black families leave and white couples flood in. And all the while, rents surge, making real-estate development look like an engine of gentrification rather than an engine of affordability.

But that displacement happens only because building dense housing is illegal in many rich neighborhoods, and because cities build so little of it overall. “If you want to build enough to really help low-income people, you’re talking about doing a lot of building,” Rick Jacobus, an expert on inclusionary housing and the principal of Street Level Urban Impact Advisors, told me.