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Re: Detroit

Posted: Wed Jun 20, 2018 10:02 am
by TheLastGentleman
I'm glad they're planning to save the train station. It's going to be an expensive project

Re: Detroit

Posted: Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:39 pm
by FangKC
Work to start soon on Michigan Central Station rehabilitation.

City Council grants key approval for massive tax breaks for Ford redevelopment


https://detroit.curbed.com/2018/10/16/1 ... evelopment

Re: Detroit

Posted: Mon Nov 04, 2019 10:53 pm
by FangKC
This is an amazing transformation of an abandoned house in Detroit.

https://tinyurl.com/y494gwtn

Re: Detroit

Posted: Thu Nov 19, 2020 5:53 am
by FangKC

Re: Detroit

Posted: Thu Mar 25, 2021 4:02 pm
by Chris Stritzel
Gilbert announces $500M to revitalize Detroit neighborhoods

https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/ ... 994554002/

Re: Detroit

Posted: Fri Mar 26, 2021 11:08 pm
by FangKC
Ford is moving into one of Detroit’s oldest neighborhoods. Can it prevent displacement?

Can a major company move into a new neighborhood without hiking up the cost of living? Corktown in Detroit is about to find out.

https://www.fastcompany.com/90618525/fo ... ontent=rss

Location:

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.345709 ... 1e3?hl=en

Re: Detroit

Posted: Tue Mar 30, 2021 7:56 pm
by langosta
If Quicken collapses or the CEO dies, do we think Detroit won't wither away again?

Re: Detroit

Posted: Tue Mar 30, 2021 9:24 pm
by FangKC
It might languish for awhile. Long-term, if climate change predictions are on point, in 100 years Detroit might be warmer in winter, and with its' proximity to the Great Lakes water, a climate refuge city.
The millions of people moving north will mostly head to the cities of the Northeast and Northwest, which will see their populations grow by roughly 10%, according to one model. Once-chilly places like Minnesota and Michigan and Vermont will become more temperate, verdant and inviting. Vast regions will prosper; just as Hsiang’s research forecast that Southern counties could see a tenth of their economy dry up, he projects that others as far as North Dakota and Minnesota will enjoy a corresponding expansion. Cities like Detroit; Rochester, New York; Buffalo and Milwaukee will see a renaissance, with their excess capacity in infrastructure, water supplies and highways once again put to good use.
https://www.propublica.org/article/clim ... -migration
There may be other refuges to the east. Don’t count out the elevated inland cities in the country’s midsection, like Minneapolis, Salt Lake City, Milwaukee and Detroit, said Matthew E. Kahn, a professor of environmental economics at the University of California, Los Angeles.

“I predict we’re going to have millions of people moving to those areas,” he said in a telephone interview.

In his 2010 book “Climatopolis,” Professor Kahn predicts that when things get bad enough in any given location — not just the temperatures and extreme weather, but also the cost of insurance and so forth — people will become “environmental refugees,” fleeing cities like Phoenix, Los Angeles and San Diego. By 2100, he writes, Detroit will be one of the nation’s most desirable cities.
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/23/sci ... afest.html