Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

KC topics that don't fit anywhere else.
Maitre D
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college graduations

Post by Maitre D » Fri Jun 15, 2007 3:48 pm

phna wrote:    Just as "birds of a feather, flock together" it is natural for ethnic communities to congregate at businesses or places which meet their specific needs,


And now, even college graduations!


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Separatist graduations proliferate at UCLA.
13 June 2007

Commencement weekend is hard to plan at the University of California, Los Angeles. The university now has so many separate identity-group graduations that scheduling them not to conflict with one another is a challenge. The women’s studies graduation and the Chicana/Chicano studies graduation are both set for 10 AM Saturday. The broader Hispanic graduation, “Raza,” is in near-conflict with the black graduation, which starts just an hour later.




http://www.city-journal.org/html/eon2007-06-13jl.html
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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by FangKC » Fri Jun 15, 2007 5:14 pm

The diversity of America has had great benefits.

A non-official language spoken only in our country helped the US and the Allies in both World Wars.  The Navajo code talkers transmitted coded messages based on the unwritten Navajo language, which the Japanese could never break.  It was also used in the Korean and Vietnam wars. 

"The Imperial Japanese Army and Navy never cracked the spoken code, and high ranking military officers have stated that the United States would never have won the Battle of Iwo Jima without the secrecy afforded by the code talkers."

Who are the Code Talkers?

The Navajo Code Talkers, whose ranks exceed 400 during the course of World War II in the Pacific Theater.  Have been credited with saving countless lives and hastening the end of the war. The Code Talker's served in all six Marine divisions from 1942 to 1945.

The Code Talker's primary job was to talk and transmit information on tactics, troop movements, orders and other vital battlefield information via telegraphs and radios in their native dialect.  A major advantage of the code talker system was its speed. The method of using Morse code often took hours where as, the Navajos handled a message in minutes.  It has been said that if was not for the Navajo Code Talker's, the Marines would have never taken Iwo Jima.   

The Navajo's unwritten language was understood by fewer than 30 non-Navajo's at the time of WWII.  The size and complexity of the language made the code extremely difficult to comprehend, much less decipher.  It was not until 1968 that the code became declassified by the US Government.   

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_talker
 
http://www.navajocodetalkers.org/

http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq61-2.htm
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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by Maitre D » Fri Jun 15, 2007 5:22 pm

FangKC wrote: The diversity of America has had great benefits.

Does it have any downsides, tho?
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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by mean » Fri Jun 15, 2007 6:28 pm

Does anything not? That shouldn't even be a question; the question should be, do the benefits outweigh the downsides.
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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by Sportster » Fri Jun 15, 2007 8:18 pm

How come the only word painfully and visibly absent from any above post is:

"Illegal"

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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by phxcat » Fri Jun 15, 2007 8:58 pm

justin8216 wrote: The difference is those immigrants such as the Germans you spoke of came here legally and became US citizens, learned English, and were entitled to vote. Our newest immigrants aren't doing any of that and aren't entitled to vote. Its common sense really. I'm for absolute amnesty. But until they learn English and receive their citizenship papers they should not be voting in our elections. We could literally have Chinese, Russian, or Al Qaida operatives voting in our elections.
This is about the biggest piece of paranoia out there.  Nobody is voting without a citizenship.  You need to register to vote, not just show up with a drivers license, and they are going to run you through the records when you register.  Undocumented immigrants don't want to vote because, first of all, most probably don't care, and second, they don't want to bring attention to themselves to risk deportation.  If you disagree with me, find an example of an undocumented immigrant voting, and I'll revisit this post.  Also, if they do vote, so what?  How is Al Qaida going to sneak enough voting terrorists into the country to swing an election from one American candidate to another American candidate?

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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by phxcat » Fri Jun 15, 2007 9:09 pm

And the other thing is that most of the fears about undocumented immigrants are untrue.  They do pay taxes  (sales tax), most don't make enough money to pay income tax, but if they do have a fake social security card, they will be paying into the system but not taking anything out.  They do learn English- I wouldn't be surprised if 15-20% of my students are undocumented- but they all learn English, and they often talk to each other in English.  I have had several students that were not aware that they were undocumented until they started looking for jobs or to go to college.  How is that for a bit of gray in the issue?  There are many kids who were brought across as babies or infants, and know nothing about Mexico.  Trust me, from living out here for five years, I will tell you that its not that big a deal.  Just like every other group, they move here, the first generation may have some trouble learning the language, but the second generation learns it just fine and assimilates as well as any other immigrant group in our history.  The biggest differences are numbers (just because Mexico is so close) and relative brownness of the skin, which should never be a consideration at all.

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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by tat2kc » Fri Jun 15, 2007 9:18 pm

Maitre D wrote:
Does it have any downsides, tho?

Only if you are fearful of people different than you.
Are you sure we're talking about the same God here, because yours sounds kind of like a dick.

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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by Maitre D » Fri Jun 15, 2007 11:54 pm

tat2kc wrote:
Only if you are fearful of people different than you.

Wow, Tat.  That was deeeeep.  I can tell you're an educator, with such an original thought as this.

I've heard lots of in-depth debate on both sides, but your analysis simply blows everything away.  Why didn't I think of this before?
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hmmm

Post by Maitre D » Sat Jun 16, 2007 12:14 am

phxcat wrote: And the other thing is that most of the fears about undocumented immigrants are untrue.  They do pay taxes  (sales tax), most don't make enough money to pay income tax, but if they do have a fake social security card, they will be paying into the system but not taking anything out. 

Heritage says the amnesty will cost taxpayers 2.6T in lifetime net taxes:
http://www.heritage.org/Research/Immigration/wm1490.cfm


They do learn English- I wouldn't be surprised if 15-20% of my students are undocumented- but they all learn English, and they often talk to each other in English.
 

The average student in America costs 8K to educate.  If you have kids in your class who aren't paying income taxes, how are they getting their 8K/kid paid for?  I assume you're not working pro-bono.  Educate me on the math here.


Trust me, from living out here for five years, I will tell you that its not that big a deal.
Nah, I won't trust you.  Rasmussen Polling says that over 56% of Arizona residents oppose the immigration bill while only 24% support it.  70% favor making the bill tougher on enforcement. 
http://freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1845749/posts


Further, in the ballot-box issues of last NOV, Arizona voters opposed immigrant-friendly positions on every item.




 
Just like every other group, they move here, the first generation may have some trouble learning the language, but the second generation learns it just fine and assimilates as well as any other immigrant group in our history


Wrong on point 2, and you provide no evidence for point 3. 

Pew Research says that not even 1/2 of  2nd Gen Latinos speak even majority English.
http://www.imdiversity.com/Villages/His ... sh1229.asp


The biggest differences are numbers (just because Mexico is so close)


Untrue. The immigrant wave of the 1880s was both absolutely - and proportionally - much, much larger than the Mexican one of today.  So that's not the difference.


and relative brownness of the skin, which should never be a consideration at all.
Ah, but it is!  Just ask the Left if skin color should ever be a consideration in public policy.  (I'll bet you already know the answer, this one's easy)
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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by Beermo » Sat Jun 16, 2007 9:57 am

phxcat wrote: This is about the biggest piece of paranoia out there.  Nobody is voting without a citizenship.  You need to register to vote, not just show up with a drivers license, and they are going to run you through the records when you register. 
maybe it's has changed since, but i just called the election board and they sent me my voter registration card. i have been a u.s. citizen since i was about 10 years old. don't have any proof of it right now because i lost my papers in a move about 20 years ago. i do have an old passport though. maybe that's enough.

i think what really works for me is that i'm a white guy with blond hair and speak the same english as everyone else. people i know are very surprised when i tell them i'm not from here and was born in another country.

on the immigration thing...

i don't really understand why people get so upset about the u.s. trying to stop illegal immigration. my mom came over to the u.s. with me when she was 20 years old. she had to have a sponsor and that sponsor had to guarantee that she would get my mom a job. my mom had to have all her paper work in order and possess a green card. she worked 2-3 jobs at a time when i was growing up and now has been working at harrah's as a card dealer since they opened and yes she does speak very good english. she even has her own little house in sugar creek. after 10 years in the u.s. she got sworn in as a new u.s. citizen at the downtown courthouse.
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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by advocrat » Sat Jun 16, 2007 10:30 am

tjokskalle wrote: these photos are depressing me!  This Avenue/blvd has so much potential but its quickly
giving way to latino shops that only cater to latinos with spanish signs and umpa music and
the vibe of tijauna;all that is missing is the donkey act but i`m sure they`re heading north as we speak.
Before this thread dies, I have to put my two cents in. I don't think that you believe you have ethnic biases, but your main point gives that impression to many who see it. And this should be a concern for you.

If you or anyone else vacations in San Francisco and decides to do the tourist thing in China Town, and you arrive there and all evidence of the culture is "anglicized" wouldn't you feel a bit robbed? Same thing could be said if you decided to go to Little Italy in New York or the Hill in St. Louis, and there was nothing of it left of it.  You and everyone must remember is that these cultural/ethnic neighborhoods weren't created as tourist attractions but rather emerged as places where immigrants settled and then developed. Over time the neighborhood and culture came to be something that was appreciated and valued not only on a local but also on a national level-even celebrated. 

I'm not sure what you would want Independence avenue to be, but it seems you want it not to become an ethnic neighborhood.  I hope your don't feel this way about Southwest boulevard and its Hispanic identity. Do you want to Anglized its character and replace its markets, restaurants and shops with T-mobile, Applebees, a Starbucks, a K-State/MU store, NASCAR visitors center and Boulevard Beer apparel boutique?
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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by phxcat » Sat Jun 16, 2007 11:40 am

Maitre D wrote:
Heritage says the amnesty will cost taxpayers 2.6T in lifetime net taxes:
http://www.heritage.org/Research/Immigration/wm1490.cfm
First of all, the Heritage Foundation is not an ubiased source.  I would like to take an indepth look at the study and see how they are figuring that, but I would be willing to bet that it not using all of the data. There have been tons of "studies" out here that have shown that a majority of prisoners in the Maricopa system are undocumented (which I'm sure you can guess is pure horsecrap) and similar studies that use creative definitions and statistics to come up with the numbers that they want.  I'll revisit this once I have had time to look things over later.  They figure in the costs, but forget to figure in the benefits.
Maitre D wrote: The average student in America costs 8K to educate.  If you have kids in your class who aren't paying income taxes, how are they getting their 8K/kid paid for?  I assume you're not working pro-bono.  Educate me on the math here.
The cost of education is one part of the equation, and has never been paid for equally by everyone.  Educating kids who can't pay the 8K pays off in the long run by providing society with an educated populace.
Maitre D wrote:
Nah, I won't trust you.  Rasmussen Polling says that over 56% of Arizona residents oppose the immigration bill while only 24% support it.  70% favor making the bill tougher on enforcement. 
http://freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1845749/posts


Further, in the ballot-box issues of last NOV, Arizona voters opposed immigrant-friendly positions on every item.
That's because of scare tactics used by the Right (and we do have an active reactionary right out here).  Stories have been floated like the one above about the prisons, and the paranoia about legal immigrants voting (they don't, but that didn't keep people from passing the voter ID law- a law which has not prevented one illegal immigrant from voting, but did cause problems for other voters who hadn't gotten their license changed when they moved.  Arizona gives licenses that don't expire until you turn 65, so people who move around are more likely to have a valid license with an out of date address.)

Its the same paranoia as has accompanied every other wave of immigration.  People are told horror stories, and believe then all, but you would be hard pressed to find someone who has experienced problems first hand (besides have to be around people who are different from them).  I'm not saying that there aren't issues to be addressed, just that the perception is worse than reality.
Maitre D wrote:
Wrong on point 2, and you provide no evidence for point 3. 

Pew Research says that not even 1/2 of  2nd Gen Latinos speak even majority English.
http://www.imdiversity.com/Villages/His ... sh1229.asp

Read it again- that's not what it says:

Most U.S. Latinos are bilingual, 54.7 percent, say Census data—and consume media in both Spanish and English. The 2002 National Survey of Latinos by the Pew Hispanic Center found that 46 percent of second-generation and 78 percent of third-generation adult Hispanics speak mostly English.

Maitre D wrote:

Untrue. The immigrant wave of the 1880s was both absolutely - and proportionally - much, much larger than the Mexican one of today.  So that's not the difference.



Ah, but it is!  Just ask the Left if skin color should ever be a consideration in public policy.  (I'll bet you already know the answer, this one's easy)
OK, then there is no problem.  Why are you wasting your time on it?

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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by phxcat » Sat Jun 16, 2007 11:44 am

Beermo wrote:

on the immigration thing...

i don't really understand why people get so upset about the u.s. trying to stop illegal immigration. my mom came over to the u.s. with me when she was 20 years old. she had to have a sponsor and that sponsor had to guarantee that she would get my mom a job. my mom had to have all her paper work in order and possess a green card. she worked 2-3 jobs at a time when i was growing up and now has been working at harrah's as a card dealer since they opened and yes she does speak very good english. she even has her own little house in sugar creek. after 10 years in the u.s. she got sworn in as a new u.s. citizen at the downtown courthouse.

I don't think anyone has a problem with trying to stop illegal immigration.  The question is how?  Progressives and liberals want to go to the root of the problem, which is to go after the US companies who hire them, and maybe work with Mexico to improve their economy so that they won't have the need to move here, and Conservatives tend to demonize them, build a wall and try to send them all back without looking at the core issues.

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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by justin8216 » Sat Jun 16, 2007 3:28 pm

phxcat wrote: .......Nobody is voting without a citizenship.  You need to register to vote, not just show up with a drivers license, and they are going to run you through the records when you register........
You may not be aware of this but you don't have to be registered in advance of election day, you don't even have to be at the right precint.

All you do is show up at the poll on election day with your drivers license.

If you are not in the voter book, you are directed to the provisional ballot judge.

There you fill out a voter registration form (wether or not you think you are already registered) that is attached to the provisional ballot.

All you need when registering is to put you DL # on the form. Every illegal I know has a valid KS drivers license.

You are given a ticket with a number to call to find out wether your vote was counted per state law. 70 percent of provisional ballots are typically counted, the rest are disqualified for various reasons, such as the voter had already voted in another county.

What records pray tell are they being run through that show they are not citizens when they register? There is no such records anywhere except may be the census bureau and that information can not be shared with other government agencies per federal law.

I know this because I have worked for the census bureau and as an election judge.

I have had people come vote who do not speak English. How is that possible if learning English is a requirement to gain citenship?

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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by phxcat » Sat Jun 16, 2007 7:49 pm

Voting laws and registration varies by state (besides federal requirements).  They could use SS#.  I don't have a problem with that.  As for language, they may have been Puerto Rican, they may have been born in the US and then moved back to Mexico as children, or may have been the exception to the rule, Americans who grew up in a Mexican neighborhood (maybe a small town near the border) and just never learned English.  Or, maybe you just made that up in order to prove a point.

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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by tat2kc » Sun Jun 17, 2007 11:10 am

Louisiana has two official languages: English and French. Many folks in south Louisiana are bilingual, both french/creole and English. A lot of cajuns my mom's age and mine don't speak English well at all, and they've been in the country for generations.
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Post by Maitre D » Sun Jun 17, 2007 2:43 pm

phxcat wrote: The cost of education is one part of the equation, and has never been paid for equally by everyone.  Educating kids who can't pay the 8K pays off in the long run by providing society with an educated populace.
That may be correct (altho the KCMO school district may disprove it)......but that still doesn't answer my question about who is paying for it.

That's because of scare tactics used by the Right (and we do have an active reactionary right out here). 


Border security trumps amnesty as the primary goal for a majority of voters across party lines.  Plenty of Democrats (mostly union laborers and blacks) don't really like the illegal immigration we have today.


Stories have been floated like the one above about the prisons, and the paranoia about legal immigrants voting (they don't, but that didn't keep people from passing the voter ID law- a law which has not prevented one illegal immigrant from voting, but did cause problems for other voters who hadn't gotten their license changed when they moved.  Arizona gives licenses that don't expire until you turn 65, so people who move around are more likely to have a valid license with an out of date address.)
I tend to agree.  The ID issue isn't a very big one to me.


Read it again- that's not what it says:

Most U.S. Latinos are bilingual, 54.7 percent, say Census data—and consume media in both Spanish and English. The 2002 National Survey of Latinos by the Pew Hispanic Center found that 46 percent of second-generation and 78 percent of third-generation adult Hispanics speak mostly English.
I think we're saying the same thing here - a majority of 2nd Gen Latinos don't speak mostly English.  They speak some.

OK, then there is no problem. 
Since we're about the see the Pro-Amensty folks (Bush, Ted Kennedy, McCain) try for a 5th, 6th, or is it 7th time now.....it must be a problem.   If it's not, they wouldn't keep trying to get their special interest bill passed.  It's like an immigration Gulag.

Why are you wasting your time on it?

Because I'd like to know if these immigrants will come to the States and immediately be given preferential treatment due to laws designed really, for American Blacks.   I still have no answer to the conundrum, does race matter or does it not?   Either it does (affirm action, quotas, reparations, etc) or it doesn't (immigration).  Just tell me which.
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Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by FangKC » Sun Jun 17, 2007 4:32 pm

It appears that the laws of most states mandate that non-residents aliens of US states (with no proof of American citizenship) are issued non-resident drivers licenses which have that status printed on them.  Thus, a drivers license ID requirement for voting would make that clear to an election judge.

It appears that one cannot get a drivers license in Missouri or Kansas without presenting proof of citizenship, residency in the state, immigration papers, or a passport. Non-residents aliens must have a valid drivers license from their country of origin, which would also prove their status as non-residents aliens, and they would then be issued a non-resident drivers license.

A non-resident drivers license, or number, would not be accepted for voter registration.

http://www.dmv.org/mo-missouri/apply-license.php

According to Missouri law, anyone who applies for a new license or renews a current license must provide proof of their identity, residency, and lawful presence in the United States. If you are a first-time driver, you must also take with you a Driver Examination Record (DOR-100) indicating successful completion of your tests. (The DOR-100 is not required if you're applying for a non-driver ID card.)
Testing for a MO DL.

“Show Me Proof” became effective July 1, 2005, and affects all Missouri driver license, nondriver license, and instruction permit holders. There are three primary requirements:

Proof of Lawful Presence
Proof of Identity
Proof of Residency

To show proof of lawful presence, a U.S. Citizen may show a birth certificate issued by a state or local government (with an embossed or raised seal), a valid or expired U.S. passport, a Certificate of Citizenship, Certificate of Naturalization, or a Certificate of Birth Abroad. Proof of lawful presence is a requirement. Exemption: Missourians age 65 or older who are renewing a driver license or nondriver license are NOT required to show proof of lawful presence. This exemption does not pertain to those age 65 or older who are obtaining a license for the first time or have a license expired for more than 184 days.

To show proof of identity, a Social Security card or Medicare card with your current name can be presented. If your name on the Social Security card or Medicare card does not match your current name, additional documents must be presented to supply proof of your name change. A complete list of documents that will be accepted as proof of identity is available. After showing proof of identity, you will only need to present proof of identity on future renewals should your name change.

To show proof of residency, you have a variety of options to prove your current address. Examples include a recent utility bill (including phone, electric, gas, water, sewer, and cable), property tax receipt, or most recent bank statement, voter ID card, or any official letter issued within the last 30 days by another state or local governmental agency on its letterhead. Proof of residency will be required each time you apply to renew a driver license, nondriver license, or instruction permit. A complete list of documents that will be accepted as proof of residency is available. If you are under the age of 21 and cannot provide proof of residency, a parent or legal guardian may provide such a document on your behalf.

Non-U.S. citizens should examine the complete listing of acceptable documents for proof of lawful presence.

If you were born in Missouri and need to obtain a copy of your birth certificate, you may contact the Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services for assistance.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Requirements for Non-Resident Aliens applying for drivers license in Missouri

http://www.dor.mo.gov/mvdl/drivers/idrequirements.pdf

If you are a new Missouri resident, you'll need to surrender your valid out-of-state license and provide proof of your identity, residency, and lawful presence in the United States. You'll need to complete a short vision screening and road sign test, but you won't need to take the written exam or driving skills test unless your previous license has been expired for more than 184 days.

Examples of voter proof of identity in Missouri:

http://www.sos.mo.gov/elections/voterid/default.asp

Rules for voting by provisional ballots in Missouri

http://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/csr/curre ... 5c30-8.pdf

In the State of Kansas:

To register to vote in Kansas, you must provide a drivers license or immigration naturalization number on the form.    If you are a non-resident alien or former alien who doesn't provide the naturalization number, it will become known when the drivers license number, and/or Social Security number, is verified because it will have non-resident status indicated.

Driver's License Information
Proof of Identity
Acceptable Documentation

A Social Security Number is required, however it will not be used as your driver license or ID card number.  If a Social Security Number cannot be provided, documentation from list B proving lawful presence and a signed affidavit will be required.  All documents presented must be the original or a certified copy; no photocopies will be accepted.

In addition to a verifiable Social Security Number, two of the following documents must be presented. One document must be from list A, and the second document must be from list A, B, C or D.  If a valid photo Driver’s License (DL) issued by another state is used, a second document from list A, B, C or D will be required.  Applicants presenting foreign documents must provide proof of lawful presence from list B, and a second document from lists C or D, and proof of residency is required.

A)  Documentation for American Citizens or persons born in the United States:

Certified U.S. birth certificate (federal, state, county, Dept. of Justice and Bureau of Indian Affairs)
U. S. Passport (not expired)
U. S. Military ID (active duty, dependent, retired, reserve or National Guard)
Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Identification Card
Certified Order of Adoption-original U.S. document
Certificate of Naturalization with intact photo
Photo DL issued by a U.S. state (if expired, requires additional documentation)
B)  Documentation for any other person:  (All forms in this category must be valid and will require proof of residency)

Valid foreign passport with I-94 or valid “Processed for I-551” stamp (not expired)
I-94 with refugee status (passport not required)
Valid I-551 Resident Alien/Permanent resident card
Valid photo Temporary Resident and valid photo Employment Authorization
Valid U.S. Military ID (dependent)
C)  Documentation for Proof of name:

Certified marriage certificate, U.S., city, county, state, or foreign issued (translation may be required); no church documents allowed
Certified divorce decree, U.S. or foreign, with official signature (translation may be required)
Certified court order of name change, U.S. or foreign, with official signature (translation may be required)
Valid U.S. Military ID (active duty, dependent, retired, reserve and National Guard)
Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal ID card
Certified court order of adoption
Photo DL or ID card issued by a U.S. state (if expired requires additional documentation)
D)  Additional Documentation to apply for a replacement Kansas DL or ID card:

Valid motor vehicle registration with signature
Selective Service Card with signature
Valid life insurance card or policy
Valid health insurance card or policy
Vehicle title
Diploma or GED
Professional license
Kansas welfare card with photo and signature
Valid Foreign DL (certified translation may be required)
Parole documents
Medical records
Kansas voter registration card
Church marriage certificate (not accepted to change name)
Photo DL issued by a U.S. state (if expired, requires additional documentation)
Foreign birth certificate (certified translation may be required, cannot be used as primary identification document)
May recite recent driving history to satisfaction of Examiner
E)  Documents for Proof of Kansas Residency must be in the name of the applicant (this list is not all inclusive, other documents may work to provide proof of residency).

Kansas school forms; such as tuition invoices, receipts, class schedules, report cards, or transcripts with the applicant’s Kansas residential address; or, school, college or university records containing the student’s name and Kansas address
Kansas utility bills that display a Kansas address
Kansas property tax bill or receipt indicating a Kansas address
Kansas mortgage documents or homeowner insurance documents for a Kansas residence or proof of Kansas home ownership with a Kansas address
Kansas W-2 Form not more than 18 months old with the applicant’s name and Kansas address
Valid Kansas Motor Vehicle registration
Proof of Kansas public assistance with a Kansas address
Residential rental and/or lease agreement with a Kansas address
DE-56a (rev. 02/07)
There is no fifth destination.

phxcat
Hotel President
Hotel President
Posts: 3454
Joined: Mon Nov 11, 2002 5:11 pm
Location: Phoenix

Re: Immigrant influences and the positives and negatives of cultural diversity

Post by phxcat » Sun Jun 17, 2007 5:42 pm

MD, I see what you are talking about with the Pew study- the use of the word "mostly".  I read that as saying that they (46% of second generation) speak English mostly, as compared to Spanish.  Most of the rest speak both, but prefer Spanish. 


As for whether race should matter, it shouldn't, but affirmative action is there because it does.

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