Uptown Shoppes

Discuss items in the urban core outside of Downtown as described above. Everything in the core including the east side (18th & Vine area), Plaza, Westport, Brookside, Valentine, Waldo, 39th street, & the entire midtown area.
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warwickland
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Re: Uptown Shoppes

Post by warwickland » Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:59 pm

this is a bizarre site plan. reminds me of those weird hybrid suburban developments that are trying to emulate "city living."

brewcrew1000
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Re: Uptown Shoppes

Post by brewcrew1000 » Fri Sep 21, 2018 2:15 pm

warwickland wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:59 pm
reminds me of those weird hybrid suburban developments that are trying to emulate "city living."
That should be the Motto of Kansas City - "Hybrid Suburban City trying to Emulate City Living while saving surface lot parking"

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chaglang
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Re: Uptown Shoppes

Post by chaglang » Sat Sep 22, 2018 8:57 pm

Signs are posted for the upcoming CPC hearing.

yeliab
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Re: Uptown Shoppes

Post by yeliab » Thu Nov 01, 2018 10:47 am

FangKC wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 11:45 pm
The most ecologically-sound method of providing housing is to reuse older structures and just improve the insulation; and methods that are used to heat and cool them. For example, add a lot of insulation in the roof and walls, and put solar panels on the roof. If you stop using mostly natural gas and coal to heat and cool a 100-year-old single family house, that is a huge step forward.
I agree 100% about the ecological argument. Socio-economically, I would add that we have more vacant homes than homeless folks in this country. We don't actually *need* new housing, and you're absolutely right that destruction just to build anew is incredibly damaging to the earth. Many recent developments do not seem to be built for longevity (nor ecological friendliness), so many of them we may be rebuilding or repairing in just a few decades. This is one of the problems with the commodification of housing -- what incentive would developers have to create long-lasting structures planned obsolesce essentially guarantees you a future market (especially if you have already destroyed the sturdier structures)? In my opinion, it would be wise to invest in fixing up the abundance of existing properties utilizing existing materials when possible.

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FangKC
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Re: Uptown Shoppes

Post by FangKC » Thu Nov 01, 2018 5:47 pm

We also have a potential workforce if we would train them in home repair and construction. There are unemployed living in the community. We would need to train people who can manage complicated projects like home renovation. You can have all the trained unemployed in the world, but if you don't have people capable of the complex skills it takes to run a home renovation business, then it's for naught. Most construction companies are set up to build new houses, to fix up derelict houses.

There are other methods of building homes than traditional wood-framed. One of the most ecological and efficient types are rammed-earth homes--especially in arid desert areas. However, it would take changing building codes.

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